29 Best Foods To Make You Healthier [2020 Up-To-Date List]

29 Best Foods That Will Make You Healthier [2020 Up-To-Date List]

Sunflower seeds are delicious!

In 2020, you want to be healthier and so does your body! Your amazing body systems are SO smart, they harbor resources for you to use when they need them. Sometimes they even manufacture nutrients they need when your food sources don’t make them available!

Elderberries will keep you from getting sick!

But of course, you want to make smart, healthier food choices for the betterment of your own physical well-being!

So – here listed are 29 best foods to select for 2020!

Vegetables

Cabbage, olives, artichokes, garlic, onions, dark green leafy vegetables, yams, asparagus, cucumbers, peas, zucchini (10)

Asparagus is so nutritious!

 

 

Nuts and seeds

Walnuts, cashews, almonds, sunflower seeds (4)

 

 

 

Eggs (1)

 

 

Legumes

Beans, green and dried (2)

Unprocessed grains

Barley, oatmeal, brown rice, millet (4)

Extra-virgin olive oil

or balanced omega 3-6-9 oil (flax) incorporated into all meals (1)

Fruits:

Melons, grapes, apples, elderberries (4)

Fermented dairy products (cheese, yogurt and kefir) (1)

Fish, moderate consumption (1)

Polyphenol filled drinks and foods such as wine, coffee, green tea, chocolate, low consumption (1)These fruit are full of anti-oxidants!Olives are key to the healthy Mediterranean diet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond the above twenty-nine listed food groups, it may be helpful to know that a number of governments around the world have agreed on one type of eating as being the healthiest:The Mediterranean Diet pyramid

The Mediterranean Diet

The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, is the closest to a perfect diet that various governments have mutually acknowledged. Portrayed by the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), it shows a family at the center, eating a meal together. The second blue line up depicts teas, and plenty of water. The pale green line above is filled with fruits, hot teas, vegetables and two symbols of grain/bread/cereals. Grain products are depicted as less than one-fifth of the main menu for the week. Above that are nuts, seeds, herbs, olives, oils, shallots, onions, and garlic. Cheeses and cultured milk products appear to be only three parts for an entire week and fish, chicken, eggs and beans appear to have four, but are in a narrowing pyramid, and so are not to be consumed as frequently as the segment below. Flour crackers, potatoes, beef and sausage should each be consumed no more than once a week according to this pyramid and cake at the top is apparently kept for special occasions only. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30409085,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23939686).

The Scottish made oats a staple in their dietsWest African women grinding their diet staple, millet

The Mediterranean diet is not really a diet, but a way of life for those living there. Across the world, each culture has found nutritious foods that work for them.

The West African women above grinding millet, keep their families healthy by providing them with fermented foods, millet, peanuts, fish, hot peppers, lemons and much more. As a child, I used to greatly enjoy a fermented food called “mona” when I went visiting in the village of Djibanar, Senegal.

Those in the British Isles have used oats for centuries to fortify and feed their families. Haggis, smoked fish, meat pies and stews have supplemented many a family’s menu.

Cold-water fish are a staple in Alaska. Salmon has come to be in great demand world-wide due to its health benefits.

Alaskan salmon on the move!

Diets across the world have been examined by various officials in a great number of countries. One of these studies culminated in the following picture claiming that even respiratory health depended on nutritional intake.

Dietary patterns and their ramificationsUS National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health Journal List Nutrients v.7(3); 2015 Mar PMC4377870

Centre for Asthma and Respiratory Diseases, Level 2, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Lot 1 Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia;Bronwyn S. Berthon and Lisa G. Wood Copyright © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI,Basel,Switzerland https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/core/lw/2.0/html/tileshop_pmc/tileshop_pmc_inline.html?

Even if you cannot take time to exercise like everyone claims you should, you CAN trade out poorer quality foods for better ones! This simple change will make your life better and you healthier as you enter the year 2020!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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